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Join Us for the Transit of Mercury Watch!

12 noon until Sunset 4 pm, Monday November 11

*This is a FREE event (small donation requested, or buy a copy of the AI magazine or join!)

The next Mercury Transit is 13 Nov 2032 which will also be visible from Ireland


TRANSIT MAGAZINE/PHOTOS WANTED : if you don't have equipment to watch the Transit in safety don't worry, Astronomy Ireland will be doing a special feature reporting on what was seen from Ireland and showing every photograph we get from Irish photographers (and a select few of the best from around the world and from space). So be sure to subscribe to the magazine and follow Irish astronomy - remember we have a monthly Sky Diary of everything to see in Irish skies each month written by Ireland's best known astronomer David Moore which is not available anywhere else. And, we report all Irish observations sent in to us every month. It is THE magazine of Irish astronomy that you should be getting every month:
Subscribe at:  www.astronomy.ie/magazine
Send photos and observations:  magazine@astronomy.ie

Astronomy Ireland is setting up the most powerful telescopes in Ireland, to show members of the general public the transit of Mercury across the Sun's face on Monday, November11th!

PLEASE NOTE:

The transit of Mercury is a rare occurence and exciting to see, but looking through your telescope or binoculars directly at the sun is VERY DANGEROUS and could result in immediate and permanent blindness, so be sure to come out to the Astronomy Ireland offices to watch the transit safely.

Open to the general public at no charge, the Mercury watch starts at 12pm (noon) and runs until sunset 4pm. Come out and enjoy this amazing sight, learn about the most powerful telescopes available outside of an observatory here in Ireland, meet other astronomy enthusiasts and have some fun. There will be loads of free posters, back issues of the magazine and refreshments on the night!

There is no charge to attend the viewing, and you'll have the chance to learn lots about the transit event, telescopes, astronomy in Ireland and much much more!

(Donations are always appreciated, or you can pick up a copy of the latest Astronomy Ireland magazine to help support the work we do.) This is a family friendly event, and we encourage you to bring your children and friends and have a great time while learning more about why Astronomy Ireland is such a popular organization.

If the weather is cloudy a telescope exhibition and workshop will be held demonstrating how to use telescopes and all the free posters will still be available as well. We'll give a short talk too, so it will be well worth coming along to visit the world's most popular astronomy society.

Have questions or need directions? To find out more about the event call us on 086 06 46 555 or email admin@astronomy.ie

(Map and Address)

Want to know more about the Mercury Transit?

A transit of Mercury across the Sun takes place when the planet Mercury comes between the Sun and the Earth, and Mercury is seen as a small black dot moving across the face of the Sun.Transits of Mercury with respect to Earth are much more frequent than transits of Venus, with about 13 or 14 per century, in part because Mercury is closer to the Sun and orbits it more rapidly.

Transits of Mercury occur in May or November. The last four transits occurred in 1999, 2003 and 2006 and on May 9, 2016.

On June 3, 2014, the Curiosity rover on the planet Mars observed the planet Mercury transiting the Sun, marking the first time a planetary transit has been observed from a celestial body besides Earth.

Transits of Mercury can happen in May or November with May transits being about half as frequent as November transits. They currently occur within a few days either side of May 8 and November 10. The interval between one November transit and the next November transit may be 7, 13, or 33 years; the interval between one May transit and the next May transit may be 13 or 33 years. May transits are less frequent than November transits because during a May transit, Mercury is near aphelion whereas during a November transit, it is near perihelion. Perihelion transits occur more frequently due to two effects: firstly, Mercury moves faster in its orbit at perihelion and can reach the transit node more quickly, and secondly at perihelion Mercury is closer to the Sun and so has less parallax.

During May transits Mercury has an angular diameter of 12"and these transits take place at the descending node of Mercury's orbit. During November transits Mercury has an angular diameter of 10"and these transits occur at the ascending node.

Transits of Mercury are gradually drifting later in the year; before 1585 they occurred in April and October.

(Courtesy of Wikipedia)

TRANSIT MAGAZINE/PHOTOS WANTED : if you don't have equipment to watch the Transit in safety don't worry, Astronomy Ireland will be doing a special feature reporting on what was seen from Ireland and showing every photograph we get from Irish photographers (and a select few of the best from around the world and from space). So be sure to subscribe to the magazine and follow Irish astronomy - remember we have a monthly Sky Diary of everything to see in Irish skies each month written by Ireland's best known astronomer David Moore which is not available anywhere else. And, we report all Irish observations sent in to us every month. It is THE magazine of Irish astronomy that you should be getting every month:
Subscribe at:   www.astronomy.ie/magazine
Send photos and observations:  magazine@astronomy.ie

 

 

 

Click HERE to see a list of other exciting Astronomy Ireland Events coming soon.

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