Tales of the Solar System

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Public Lecture June 14th 7PM on Zoom

Tales from the Solar System

By Dr. Meg Schwamb, QUB.
Lecture is Free but donations gratefully accepted.
As a non-profit organisation we are heavily dependent on your generosity at all times but especially in these challenging times.

 

“The Solar System is a weird and wonderful place. In this choose your own adventure talk, we’ll explore recent discoveries about the planets, satellites, and planetesimals residing and visiting our Solar System.”

This lecture is suitable for all ages and knowledge levels. We all know what an exciting and multi-faceted place the Solar System is. Meg is an excellent science communicator with the ability to paint a dynamic picture of this fascinating environment.

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Saturn

This lecture will be presented on the ZOOM platform in line with Public Health Guidelines.

As a non-profit organisation we are heavily dependent on your generosity at all times but especially in these challenging times. Your donations help us to keep your interest in astronomy and space alive as well as presenting you with lots of interesting and up to date information and events. If you would like to view the lecture but are not in a position to donate please email our admin team who will add you to the lecture admittance list.

 

“The Solar System is a weird and wonderful place. In this choose your own adventure talk, we’ll explore recent discoveries about the planets, satellites, and planetesimals residing and visiting our Solar System.”

This lecture is suitable for all ages and knowledge levels. We all know what an exciting and multi-faceted place the Solar System is. Meg is an excellent science communicator with the ability to paint a dynamic picture of this fascinating environment.

The Speaker

Dr Meg Schwamb Dr Meg Schwamb is a lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast. Meg’s research focuses on how planets and their building blocks form and evolve, applying ground-based surveys to probe our Solar System’s small body reservoirs. She is also involved in the Planet Four citizen science projects, which enlists the public to help study the seasonal processes of the Martian south pole and map the distribution of ridges on the Martian mid-latitudes.

Meg also serves as co-chair of the Rubin Observatory’s Legacy Survey of Space and Time  Solar System Science Collaboration.

Meg was awarded the 2017 Carl Sagan Medal for Excellence in Public Communication in Planetary Science from the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Science

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